Saturday, August 2, 2008

Search engine fun

I use sitemeter to see how people come to my site. I get very few visitors from search engines and I enjoy seeing what their search terms were before arriving to my site. Maybe, I think, I could learn what people are looking for and create posts to bring to me.

Before I talk about how people were searching for I'm going to mention a few things that I write about. I'm a parent of three kids 6 years old and younger. My wife and I have built our lives around these little leaches, I mean kids. So many of my posts are above the kids and things I think are entertaining about the kids. I've written about children's diaries, diaper accidents, circumcision and how big my butt is to them. I'm also pretty interested in politics and news today. I tend to be a centrist but I really can't stand the Sean Hannity's of the world. I believe their agenda/ratings over truth is dangerous. They lead too many small minds into the wrong battles. Therefore, I've written about Sean Hannity, martyrs (and the virgins they are promised - my attempt at humor) and elections.

So after all of that, what were the searchers looking for:
Cock mutilations
Wet diaper virgins
Sean Hannity

As of yet, there have NOT been searches regarding "Hannity in a wet diaper" but I'm waiting.

8 comments:

les said...

I can't stand the Sean Hannity's of the world! I would love to see Hannity in a wet diaper!

The Go In Betweens said...

Centrists are fun. I read and loved a McSweeney's list of the lesser known slogans of politcal moderates:

Live free or give me a reasonable alternative!

Peace through pragmatism.

Let's all keep our opinions to ourselves for a while!

It's noontime in America.

Some taxation, some representation.

What do we want? Rational discussion? When do we want it? ... What works for you?

Hooray for prudence!

We request change in a reasonable amount of time after comprehensive discussion of the options!

Who wants peanuts?

yaniiaren said...

What a refreshing post. That made me laugh. I am a Stephen Colbert fan when I visit the U.S He has ahumungous ego but he makes me laugh.

froginnorthgeorgia.com said...

That's too funny. Search engine terms can be so wrong.

jccleofe said...

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The Logisitician said...

Just read through several of your posts. I was struck by the one about the politician who showed up on your door step, since in the late 1970's and 1980's, I became disillusioned about working for politician candidates, because they appeared to be so distant and lack any time to connect personally.

I, also, find Sean Hannity troubling, from an intellectual honesty perspective. I can handle conservatism; I think that George Will is very bright, as was William F. Buckley, and there analyses worth consideration. Hannity makes such ridiculous, sweeping comments. "So and So has not done anything of value." "How is this person." "So and So is unpatriotic." "This is the most ridiculous / outrageous thing that I have ever heard or seen." Fortunately Alan Coombs is at least there to balance him out on the show, Hannity and Coombs.

As for sitemeter, I am absolutely amazed at the data which we acquire for free. Sometimes to make the data even more meaningful, I print out the multiple reports and place them side by side and read by the number to gain a better appreciation of my audience. The referral chart tells me that I get the most traffic by commenting on the post question from members of my various Google Groups, although it is time consuming. Keep up the good work.

http://www.theviewfromoutsidemytinywindow.blogspot.com

jdhayes said...

"They lead too many small minds into the wrong battles."

I absolutely LOVE that line!

Andreya padty said...

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